If you find yourself charged with allegedly committing some sort of a personal property crime in Mississippi, the precise charge could take a variety of forms. Virtually all crimes of this nature have to do with theft, and theft itself constitutes one of them.

FindLaw explains that if charged with theft, a/k/a larceny, this means that the prosecutor must prove that not only did you steal someone’s personal property, but that you also intended to permanently deprive your alleged victim of it.

Mississippi has two theft categories: petty and grand. Petty theft consists of stealing something valued at under $500, for which you could receive a maximum six-month jail sentence and/or a maximum $1,000 fine if convicted. Conversely, grand larceny consists of stealing something valued at over $500, for which you could receive a maximum 10-year prison sentence and/or a maximum $10,000 fine if convicted.

Robbery

If charged with theft, this means that you allegedly stole something while using or threatening to use force if your alleged victim refused to give you his or her property. A charge of armed robbery means that you allegedly used a weapon as part of your intent to steal. Even unloaded, fake and/or toy guns fulfill the definition of a weapon. If convicted of robbery, you could face a long prison sentence, up to and including life.

Burglary

If charged with burglary, this means that you allegedly entered a structure without the owner’s permission with the intent of committing a crime once inside. Whether or not you actually committed the crime or took any of the owner’s property constitutes an irrelevant fact. If convicted of burglary, you face a prison sentence of from three to 40 years.

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